February 21, 2024

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Is Marvell Technology (NASDAQ:MRVL) Using Too Much Debt?

Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, ‘The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about… and every practical investor I know worries about.’ So it seems the smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, Marvell Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ:MRVL) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can’t easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Marvell Technology

What Is Marvell Technology’s Net Debt?

As you can see below, Marvell Technology had US$4.67b of debt, at April 2023, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. On the flip side, it has US$1.03b in cash leading to net debt of about US$3.64b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGS:MRVL Debt to Equity History July 9th 2023

A Look At Marvell Technology’s Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Marvell Technology had liabilities of US$3.06b due within a year, and liabilities of US$3.72b falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$1.03b as well as receivables valued at US$1.00b due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$4.75b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Of course, Marvell Technology has a titanic market capitalization of US$50.9b, so these liabilities are probably manageable. Having said that, it’s clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse.

In order to size up a company’s debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

While Marvell Technology has a quite reasonable net debt to EBITDA multiple of 2.3, its interest cover seems weak, at 1.1. In large part that’s it has so much depreciation and amortisation. While companies often boast that these charges are non-cash, most such businesses will therefore require ongoing investment (that is not expensed.) Either way there’s no doubt the stock is using meaningful leverage. Pleasingly, Marvell Technology is growing its EBIT faster than former Australian PM Bob Hawke downs a yard glass, boasting a 159% gain in the last twelve months. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Marvell Technology’s ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you’re focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don’t cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the last two years, Marvell Technology actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT. There’s nothing better than incoming cash when it comes to staying in your lenders’ good graces.

Our View

Happily, Marvell Technology’s impressive conversion of EBIT to free cash flow implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But the stark truth is that we are concerned by its interest cover. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Marvell Technology takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. That means they are taking on a bit more risk, in the hope of boosting shareholder returns. There’s no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet – far from it. For example – Marvell Technology has 2 warning signs we think you should be aware of.

If you’re interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

What are the risks and opportunities for Marvell Technology?

Marvell Technology, Inc., together with its subsidiaries, provides data infrastructure semiconductor solutions, spanning the data center core to network edge.

View Full Analysis

Rewards

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 48.81% per year

Risks

  • Significant insider selling over the past 3 months

  • Volatile share price over the past 3 months

View all Risks and Rewards

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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